Supporters

Pop Warner

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Pop Warner Little Scholars, Inc. (PWLS) is a non-profit organization that promotes youth football and cheer & dance programs for participants in several states and countries around the world. 

California Youth FOotball Alliance

California Youth Football Alliance

 The purpose of the CAYFA is to advance youth tackle football by honoring our past, improving our present, and advancing our future so that more generations of student-athletes, coaches, and communities can experience the intellectual, emotional, social, and physical developmental benefits of the sport. 

American Youth Football

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American Youth Football, Inc., established in 1996, is a support services organization, dedicated to giving back to communities by promoting the wholesome development of youth through their association with exemplary adult leaders in the sport of American football and cheer. 

USA Football

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 USA Football is an independent non-profit based in Indianapolis, IN which serves as the US Olympic partner of amateur football in the United States.

Brainwashed

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 How much do we really know about CTE? Less than you think. Brainwashed addresses three pervasive myths advanced by CTE pundits and sensationalized by the media by taking a critical look at the current body of research about the disease. 


Authors: Merril Hoge and Peter Cummings , MD

ANdre Tippett

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From Day 1, to first speaker announced, Andre Tippett NEP Hall of Famer has been our biggest supporter to date.  We thank him for his commitment to the youth of the Commonwealth and the support of tackle football in our communities!

HS Coaches

David Maimaron - Duxbury HS

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 Football is the greatest life lesson teaching sport there is. Our youth are being raised in a society of instant gratification, selfishness, isolation and video games. Never in the history of our great nation has the lessons that football teaches been needed more. The decision of whether a child plays football or not should be up to the child and his or her parents, not the government. When football is taught in the proper way it is a very safe sport for children to play and the benefits far out way the risks. 

John Curley - Medford HS

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  The youth tackle football program in my community is valuable to me because it allows children to play with their age groups and with that builds a foundation for future of the high school program
 

Dan MacKay - Burlington HS

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  The youth tackle football program in my community is valuable to me because it acts as a bridge between our high school program. Myself and the youth coaches have worked together the last two years to run the same systems, I also have developed relationships with the youth players in our town through our football camp. They get excited meeting our varsity student-athletes and enjoy playing the game. Teaching the fundamentals of football at the youth level is important
for high school so student-athletes have a foundation to build upon. Learning these
fundamentals makes the game safer for youth players because they are able to develop the
necessary skills to excel when they reach the high school level.
 

Jack Martinelli - Foxboro HS

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  "The youth tackle football program in my community is valuable to me because"... ​it is the lifeblood of a proud tradition at the high school over the past 4 decades, which is a town wide common thread on Friday nights from late August to Thanksgiving. I have had the unique opportunity to take charge of some 3200 young people at the high school football level. And while there has been varied degrees of ability from year to year, I have found a resounding constant that the Foxboro Youth Football program has inspired youth, regardless of race, creed, gender or natural origin, to practice the ideals of sportsmanship and are taught the proper techniques to help insure the safety of all the kids involved. This past high school season saw 126 players in uniform on 3 different levels of play while sustaining but 1 concussion injury. It's
not about victory or defeat or X's and O's, its about allowing children to get out of their comfort zone and become accountable and responsible for their actions. The youth coaches and players are doing something right. Furthermore, the youth program stresses learning lessons of value far
beyond the playing days or cheerleading days for the children involved, such as self-discipline, leadership and dealing with adversity. For many this is there only exposure to these intangibles.
Football is a game like no other where proper technique is nurtured only over a period of time if done properly. If this bill is passed, it is the beginning of the end of football in our culture. Perhaps in 2 years the next bill will attempt to ban tackle football until you are a senior, and so on. 

Nick St. George - Longmeadow HS

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  Youth Football is important to our communities because he teaches young boys how to become better men. Football is a
difficult sport to play. It requires discipline, a good work ethic, physical and mental  toughness, and it requires that you make a commitment to a group of players. More so than any other sport football lets young players practice skills that will make them better citizens. Football teaches players the value of having discipline, what it means to work hard, they will build toughness, and they will need to be committed to a common goal in order to be successful. These are the personal attributes that will make them successful in life. It will make them better neighbors, parents, husbands, and
men.
 

Chris Sullivan - Walpole HS

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  “The youth tackle football program in my community is valuable to me because ​it boasts pride in our town. Football at any level brings communities together. No matter the level of play football teaches accountability, commitment, pride in your team and town, as well as self-pride. Every Friday night we have countless youth running around in their jersey because they are PROUD​ to wear it and, in that moment, they feel like they are part of the big team.”